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Chinese firecrackers 鞭炮

Chinese firecrackers are made of explosives stuffed into compressed spaces usually round in shape.

There are many designs of firecrackers but the most common ones are a huge stand alone firecracker or a series of fire crackers bonded into a long roll with 2 or more extending out at each level.

When the fuse is lit, the flame spreads to each firecracker and a loud explosion is heard followed by a shower of red papers that was used to wrap the fire cracker.

Firecrackers were supposed to be used to scare away the mythical being call nian and has very strong association with Chinese New Year Celebrations. However, fire crackers are used in almost every joyous occasions such as weddings, birthdays, opening of offices or new businesses as well as Chinese festivals and religious celebrations.

The abuse of fire crackers has led to outbreaks of fire and many countries and cities have banned or restrict the use of fire crackers. Despite the ban and restriction, fire crackers continue to play an important role in the celebration of Chinese festivals.

It is depicted in many Chinese New Year cards, red packets, paintings and New Year posters.  Replica Chinese fire crackers are also available and come with in many sizes some of them can mimic the real fire crackers with light and sounds. These replica ones no matter how realistically made never come close to the real thing.

During the Chinese New Year season, the explosions of fire crackers can still be heard even when it is banned. These audio effects come from Chinese New year songs that incorporate the sounds of fire crackers. These songs can be heard almost every where during the Chinese New Year period.

Fire crackers certainly have that special touch and it is hope that everyone uses them responsibly to avoid accidents.

Meanwhile for people from places where fire crackers are banned, they can make do with replicas, listen to audio files or watch our video clip. Alternatively head off to the nearest country where firecrackers are allowed.

 

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